MAKING THE IIDA SCENE

[Pictured above: COOL master of ceremonies Pedro Ayala, Director of A&D Strategies, Kimball Office, addressing the attendees]

COOL Gala Celebrates IDC and Will Ching Winners in Style

Unquestionably one of the most highly anticipated IIDA events of NeoCon, the annual COOL Black-Tie Awards Gala did not disappoint, celebrating the winners of both the 40th Annual Interior Design Competition and the 21st Annual Will Ching Design Competition. The event recognized IDC Best of Competition winner for 2013, HGA Architects and Engineers. To view images from COOL, visit the image gallery HERE.

IIDA Superleggera Event Celebrates Italian Design and Culture

_DSC0439

[Pictured above: Superleggera attendee chats with Spiaggia chef]

IIDA Headquarters became the site of a lively networking event showcasing Italian design and culture. Superleggera, hosted by IIDA in partnership with FederlegnoArredo, the Ministry of Economic Development — Italy, gathered Designers and manufacturers from Italy and the United States for an evening of relaxing and socializing.

AT THE BOOTH

FeatImage_At-The-Booth

[Pictured above: A show attendee lends her response to “Design Is…”]

IIDA Post-It® Booth Defines Design

The IIDA “Design Is …” Post-It® booth at NeoCon 2013 was a success! Designers from around the globe stopped by to join IIDA in defining Design. IIDA would like to thank everyone who participated in helping us to define Design at NeoCon 2013.

IIDA STUDENT EVENTS

2013 IIDA Student Design Charette Winners

_DSC0146

[Pictured above: IIDA Student Members discuss their design plans for the IIDA Student Design Charette]

Design students from across the country teamed up for the 2013 IIDA Student Design Charette at NeoCon 2013. After a spirited six-hour competition, each team presented its design solution for a repose lounge in The Merchandise Mart.

The winners of this year’s competition are:

First Place:
Juan Devia, Student IIDA
St. Louis Community College at Meramec

Heather Nyc, Student IIDA
Illinois State University

Elizabeth Young, Student IIDA
Purdue University

Moeko Hara, Student IIDA
New England School of Art and Design at Suffolk University

Chelsea Hughes, Student IIDA
Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design

Second Place:
Megan May, Student IIDA
Art Institute of Atlanta

Melanie Murata, Student IIDA
Florida State University

Sarah Schaub, Student IIDA
Philadelphia University

Kate Hespenheide, Student IIDA
California State University — Long Beach

People’s Choice:
Amy Ogonowski, Student IIDA
Savannah College of Art & Design — Atlanta

Will Fisher, Student IIDA
Kansas State University

Carrol Casburn, Student IIDA
Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design

Sara Allen, Student IIDA
University of North Texas

Alexandra Leigh, Student IIDA
Virginia Commonwealth University

To view photos from the Student Design Charette and to see the winners, please visit the photo gallery HERE.

Students Gain Insight at IIDA Career Bootcamp™

_DSC0502

[Pictured above: the IIDA Career Bootcamp panelists answer student questions]

On Wednesday, June 12 — the last day of NeoCon — students attended the IIDA Career Bootcamp, where they listened to a panel of experts who shared knowledge and insight on how best to start a successful design career. From basic information on how to land an interview to helpful advice on navigating the job search process Panelists included Carlos Martinez, FIIDA, Gensler; Diana Pisone, IIDA, Ted Moudis Designs; Mindi DeVries, Associate IIDA, Harley Ellis Devereaux; and Laura Schempp, The Dobbins Group.

IIDA CHANGES

As you can see, our Design Matters blog has undergone a bit of a face-lift. We hope that by re-organizing the content and connecting you to our social media outlets from one platform will help you better engage with all of the IIDA content.

Additionally, we now have a new look to our e-newsletter which shares the same name, DesignMatters. You should have received your IIDA NeoCon special edition e-newsletter this week!

We hope you enjoy the new look to our blog, e-newsletter and our new DesignMatters logo!

ABOUT ENTERING DESIGN COMPETITIONS

 

5 Things You Need To KnowYou Can’t Lose
By entering one or several projects into a design competition, there is no direction to go but up. Putting forth your work and having people see it, read it, and experience it can help you as a student and professional in several ways. As a student, you gain insight into how projects are judged and what is deemed great design, and as a professional you send your work to professionally successful and influential judges that critique it. You may even get to meet these judges and other professionals that attend the competition event to announce the winners (if the competition indeed decides to host the event); yet another conduit to showcase your work, and yourself.

5 Things You Need To Know

They Make Your Work Better
Like a workshop or group review where peers, professors, and / or professionals listen to you describe and articulate your work and then provide you with constructive feedback, a competition provides a chance for you to showcase and obtain criticism and interpret your work’s worth. Knowing ahead of time that you are submitting to a competition also creates in you a sense of awareness that others – most notably, judges – are going to review your work. It makes you internally motivated to design a project that reflects your most advanced skills because you want it to impress and have people comment on it positively.

5 Things You Need To KnowThey Encourage Efficiency
Keeping yourself organized and managing your schedule are skills all designers benefit from, and if you schedule appropriate time to submit to competitions it helps you prioritize and work more efficiently. Design competitions have specific parameters and submission requirements you must tailor your submittal to, so making sure you know exactly what you need to submit as a competition deliverable(s) is important (especially when negotiating time between school and work responsibilities). Often, competitions ask for a combination of design renders and plans, as well as a succinct and clear written component describing your project.

5 Things You Need To KnowYou Become Involved
Design competitions do a great job of involving and engaging their participants. Whether it’s through e-mail, social media, or door drops, competition participants gain access to a design network where they can keep tabs on competition deadlines, see who is judging, find where and when the competition winners are announced, and of course (the fun stuff) what they receive for winning. In addition, competitions relay other entrants’ work, winning or otherwise (with approval), which gives participants a great idea of “what’s out there” and what you can expand upon in your own projects.

5 Things You Need To KnowYou Gain Affirmation, or Reaffirmation
Personally, I’ve entered several design competitions and lost all except one. The one I placed in gave me an affirming feeling that my design skills were, in a sense, acceptable – that the work I did was given a stamp of approval that said, “Yes, this is good design.” As creative people, we consistently put work “out there” that (hopefully) reflects our best design abilities and intentions, while acting as little parts of ourselves. When your design registers with a select panel of judges and you’re listed as a finalist, your career wayfinding becomes clear and the project you devoted so much personal time to is given its time in the sun. It’s an affirming, or reaffirming, feeling that your design inspired meaning in someone – a crucial effect our creations strive to engender.