pub_talktalk_graphic_170216

Two Aviation Designers Discuss What It Takes to Elevate the Airport Experience for All Travelers

Airport design is reaching new heights. With hundreds of millions of travelers passing through these spaces every year, designers are tasked with delivering a seamless and comfortable experience to regular business commuters and first-time fliers alike. So what makes a great traveler experience? Aviation designers Wilson Rayfield, AIA, LEED AP, executive vice president at Gresham, Smith and Partners, Richmond, Virginia, USA, and Derrick Choi, AIA, LEED AP, principal and senior architect at Populous, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, check in to chat on this topic.

Perspective: What elements do the most to improve traveler experience?

Wilson Rayfield: We’re looking at things that improve the passenger experience in terms of efficiency, wayfinding, and access. Often, it’s that intuitive wayfinding—trying to create as few decision points as possible and provide visual cues to your destination. For example, in the international terminal in Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, the ticket counters, the floor pattern, the ceiling pattern, and the lighting are angled and lead visually toward your direction of travel. All the lines lead your eye toward the direction that you need to be moving in.

Derrick Choi: I’m a big advocate of a passenger-centric design approach based on three basic principles: convenience, control, and connectivity. Passengers, no matter how seasoned they are, just need to be in control of where they are. They’ve got to be connected physically, mentally, and, these days, technologically. Once all these elements are achieved, a passenger can actually begin to engage and experience the terminal facilities and start to make decisions as to what they like and what they don’t like.

rayfieldwilson_environmental

Wilson Rayfield, AIA, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Smith and Partners

Perspective: Elaborate features — such as the world’s largest indoor waterfall at Singapore’s  Changi Airport — have become a mainstay of modern airport design. Are today’s airports too focused on flash?

Rayfield: I think that has a lot to do with the context and with the community. What’s appropriate in Changi, Singapore is probably not appropriate in Nashville, Tennessee, [USA]. It’s a matter of finding things that make the airport represent the region it serves. We did a modernization project in Norfolk, Virginia, [USA] recently. With the design of the terrazzo flooring, integrating some of the nautical elements there, we refer back to the history of the region without being overwhelming. It’s part of the fabric of the design and the finishes, so it’s something that is recognizable if you find it. But it doesn’t stand out and scream at you.

Passengers, no matter how seasoned they are, just need to be in control of where they are.

Choi: I think every community has a unique story that they’d like to tell, like the Victorian-era train stations in Europe. But ultimately, financial viability is key for these public gateways. This emphasis on revenue — and the reality that passenger travel patterns have dramatically shifted in the past 15 years — has really put the emphasis on customer convenience, amenities, and concessions. Because of that, there’s a bit of a misperception that it’s all about these elaborate elements, particularly in the global context. These airports are pulling out all the stops — not only to make their operations highly affordable and attractive to airlines, but to attract passengers from all over the world.

Perspective: What future trends will shape airports?

Rayfield: I think security is going to drive airport design more than anything. Instead of having a secure side and a non-secure side with a single security checkpoint in the center, the entire airport environment will be a secure environment where they’re identifying passengers through facial recognition and other technologies. Security is going to become ubiquitous throughout the entire facility, and I think it’s going to start to become more invisible. After security, another driver is the movement toward a greater reliance on self-service passenger processing for check-in, bag check, and similar tasks, which gives passengers more control over their travel experiences and has significant repercussions for terminal design.

choi_derrick

Derrick Choi, AIA, LEED AP, Principal and Senior Architect, Populous

Choi: I think technology will continue to be a huge driver of change in several aspects. It’ll radically transform the way we think about the building. Many traditional passenger processes and physical touchpoints are being transformed, repurposed, and even blurred — creating what will hopefully be a more frictionless user environment. For example, in many airports, they’re ripping out your traditional hold room seating and creating more user-friendly spaces that are served by iPads and food service vendors that let you tap and order. Being able to have that technology will change the way you use a facility and spend money.


This post was originally published in the Fall/Winter 2016 issue of Perspective.  

Design Then, Now, Next

Envisioning the Future of the Interior Design Industry

What were you doing 20 years ago? IIDA Executive Vice President and CEO Cheryl S. Durst, Hon. FIIDA, LEED AP, opened Industry Roundtable 20, held January 6-8, 2017, with that simple question.

“Twenty years ago, commercial interior design was experiencing a transformative shift,” said Durst, who moderated the annual roundtable. “We began asking, ‘How do people work?’ instead of, ‘Where do people sit?’ We started to think beyond the job title and consider how people relate to one another in the workplace. We saw that work and life were overlapping in new ways. And, we recognized that good design is the solution for optimizing work and productivity in this new era.”

It was a fitting question to kick off the event: For two decades, Industry Roundtable has welcomed distinguished design leaders for a two-day, thought-provoking discussion about topics relevant to the Interior Design industry. This year’s topic, “Design Then, Design Now, Design Next: A 20-year Retrospective,” offered participants the rare opportunity to reflect on the history of the profession and assess the emerging economic, cultural, and social trends that are shaping the next generation of commercial interior design.

Eileen Jones, IIDA, SEGD, AIGA, LEED AP, principal and global practice leader, Perkins+Will, opened the event with her keynote presentation, “A 20-year Retrospective of the Commercial Interior Design Industry,” which provided an overview of how technology, sustainability, and the evolving purview of design have shaped the profession.

Her message was forward-looking, setting the tone for the remainder of the event. “Standing here at the end of the Information Age, we are in a unique position to figure out what is next and how we can change the world with design,” said Jones.

The group of 30 interior designers, manufacturer representatives, and thought leaders then participated in sessions focused on the future of people, place, and work, featuring speakers Julie B. Cummings, SPHR, SHRM-SCP, director of human resources, BKD, LLP; Jim Young, co-founder, Realcomm Conference Group; and Jim Ware, Ph.D., founder and executive director, Future of Work….unlimited. Much of the conversation focused on the multi-generational workforce and how to transition design leadership to younger generations.

“When I first started, I never would have imagined that human resources would be sitting at the table with design teams to talk about space,” mused Cummings who presented on The Future of People, “We need designers to guide us, consult with us on how space can meet the needs as the Boomers transition out and Millennials become even more of a force in the workplace. This is something all of my peers are wrestling with.”

Young and Ware, who spoke on the Future of Place and the Future of Work, respectively, echoed this sentiment during their presentations: Designing for the future will mean accommodating five generations, a growing population, and rising life expectancies while reckoning with a decrease in available space, a critical need for sustainable building practices, and ever-evolving technology.

“Design has the unique ability to bring together allied professions, solve problems from multiple points of view, and put society’s well-being at the forefront. This notion of the convergence of people, place, and work, and how we think about design in the context of these things is critical to what’s next for our industry,” said Durst.

An executive report, to be released in March 2017, will provide a summary of key insights from IIDA Industry Roundtable 20.


Read past Industry Roundtable executive reports online at iida.org.

Sayanomoto Clinic

IIDA Design Watch: 3 Trends in Healthcare Design

Healthcare design has been around for years, but there’s no doubt it is a hot topic at this very moment. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act, the rise of technology, and the expectation that wellness is imperative in the workplace, healthcare design is decidedly important now more than ever. We sat down with our very own Cheryl S. Durst, Hon. FIIDA, LEED AP, to see what the healthcare design forecast for 2016 – and beyond – looks like.

Community

Once upon a time, pediatric hospitals were sterile, isolated places. Today, with centers like the Ronald McDonald House, hospitals and other healthcare facilities are realizing that they’re not caring for just the patient—they’re caring for the patient’s entire family.

Creating a healthcare space that fosters community was evident in the 2015 IIDA Global Excellence Awards healthcare category winner, the Sayanomoto Clinic in Saga, Japan, by the design firm, Yamazaki Kentaro Design Workshop. The clinic, designed for patients with dementia, houses a “learning” space in the common areas so patients can spend time with their families.

“Healthcare is not just a single entity issue,” said Durst. “When someone is ill it happens to an entire family. That’s, to me, emotional intelligence. That is really employing the softer side of design that designers do best. It’s paying attention to the human being. So, the community aspect, the whole person, the whole being, the whole family is one.”

Technology vs. Humanity

Say what you will about technology, you luddites out there, there’s no denying it has improved healthcare in ways we never thought imaginable. Electronic health records, self-service kiosks, wearable medical devices, and telemedicine have made formerly cumbersome systems more efficient and increased access to care for the most vulnerable.

But how do we balance tech with humanity? For Durst, this one hits close to home. A couple of years ago before her mother passed away from cancer, Durst accompanied her on a hospital visit only to notice that the nurse who was taking her mother’s vitals never once made eye contact; the nurse was occupied with her laptop and iPad mini. “All the ways that technology would be improving healthcare – leaps and bounds – but from a personal concern, is that making healthcare less human and less humane?” said Durst. “That’s my other big thing about design — design is about dignity. Healthcare should be about dignity as well.”

Taking Over Retail

If you don’t know that there’s a Nordstrom’s that provides mammogram screenings. Now you know. Located at the Old Orchard Mall in Skokie, Illinois, patients can decide they want to shop for a couple of hours, walk in for a screening, and get their results within the same day. The convenience, ease, and comfort of getting a mammogram while shopping is in stark contrast to the clinical setting that intimidates many women from making that yearly appointment. But what if we took that one step further? “What if all of a sudden I can go to Costco, or the Dollar Store, or Wal-Mart and get a mammogram?” asked Durst. “If all of a sudden it’s as easy as going to CVS then it becomes different, and that’s design.”


Where in the World is Cheryl?

Durst will be at Design Connections Healthcare 2016 on Feb. 23 to moderate a discussion about wearables and telemedicine with panelists Alan Dash, Senior Consultant, The Sextant Group; Jocelyn Stroupe, IIDA, ASID, CHID, EDAC, Director of Healthcare Interiors, Cannon Design; and Jane Rohde, FIIDA, AIA, ACHA, AAHID, Principal, JSR Associates.

Image: Sayanomoto Clinic, Saga, Japan, by Yamazaki Kentaro Design Workshop