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IIDA New England: Committed to Interior Design Advocacy Through Action

Over the last 18 months, the IIDA New England Chapter – with help from IIDA HQ – has hired a lobbying firm, actively engaged with ASID legislative leaders, reached out to the Massachusetts design community, met with lawmakers and officials, and introduced an interior design registration bill into the Massachusetts State Legislature. Undertaking an initiative of this size and scope is no small task and requires a team effort as well as strong leadership. Aimee M. Schefano, Vice President of Advocacy for the New England Chapter, has led the charge, working diligently to convey the importance of this initiative both to the Chapter board and local design leaders.

The lesson learned by IIDA New England? IIDA Chapters have power when it comes to advocacy. Board members are leaders in the design community, and as such, have an amplified voice. When those voices are conveying the same message, real change can happen. If an issue is important to the profession, it is too important to sit on the sidelines.

In addition to the amplified voice of board members, IIDA Chapters can reallocate funding to support advocacy initiatives. While there are many priorities in a Chapter’s budget— from professional development initiatives to events—boards can help rearrange how funding is used, create new revenue streams, or prioritize advocacy and legislation above other initiatives. IIDA New England demonstrated this by using their chapter funds to engage with one of the preeminent lobbying firms in New England.

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It has also proven important for the Chapter to work together with other associations in order to build a strong network of professionals working to advance a common goal. Schefano and Past-President Corinne Barthelemy have worked with ASID New England to create the Massachusetts Advocacy Council of ASID and IIDA, operating under the two chapters and facilitating the shared mission to advance the profession of interior design.

“Educating our profession is crucial to progress. Part of that education requires IIDA members to work collaboratively with other industry leaders. We are never stronger than when we all stand together against adversity,” said Schefano. “In Massachusetts, the design community is represented by a multitude of associations. What has helped us evolve our advocacy strategy is acknowledging that ultimately we are all interior designers, and that is what is most important. “

Through unified voices, effective funding, and organizational collaborations, IIDA New England has set a foundation that will surely lead to advocacy successes in Massachusetts.


For more on interior design advocacy, visit advocacy.iida.org

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Deregulation Bills: What Do They Mean for Interior Designers?

Deregulation bills are pieces of legislation introduced by state legislators to remove part or all interior design laws in a particular state. Read on to learn more about deregulation bills and how you can get involved with advocating for the interior design industry.

Who is behind these efforts to deregulation interior design and other professions and occupations?

There isn’t one answer to this question. A legislator may have been asked to sponsor the bill by a constituent. However, several national organizations have made decreasing occupational and professional regulation a priority, including but not limited to the Institute for Justice and Americans for Prosperity. These organizations and supporters of the deregulation legislation believe that occupational and professional regulation makes it difficult for people to enter those professions, increases the cost of services by those professions, and does not protect the public.

Why should interior design be regulated?

Commercial interior designers are more than they are perceived to be. They have a tangible impact on the interior environment.

  • Regulation shows consumers and clients that an individual has met government-approved standards of education, experience, and examination.
  • Regulation gives consumers an avenue for redress.
  • Regulation demonstrates that the profession of interior design is on par with architects, landscape architects, and engineers for their prescribed scope of work.
  • Regulation expands economic opportunities for interior designers.
  • Regulation can and should include expanded privileges, such as the ability to submit their work to a building department for a permit and ability to own their own design firm.

What is IIDA doing to combat these bills?

IIDA monitors legislation in all 50 states, Washington D.C., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Congress on a daily basis. We closely monitor any legislation that pertains to the industry, but especially to attempts to undermine legislative progress. In addition, IIDA maintains open dialogue with hired lobbyists, coalitions, and ASID National. IIDA recognizes the importance of the legislative progress and continues to advocate for the voluntary registration or certification of interior designers.

In January, IIDA worked cooperatively with the Virginia/West Virginia and Mid-Atlantic IIDA Chapters and with ASID national and their Virginia chapters to combat successfully HB1824, which would have deregulated interior design in Virginia.

What can I do?

First, be aware of the laws in your state. If an action alert is sent by IIDA, ASID, or a coalition, act on those alerts. Connect with your legislator to let them know you’re an interior designer and why you care about interior design registration. No one can speak better about your profession than you.


To learn more about interior design advocacy, visit advocacy.iida.org.

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Advocacy Spotlight: New Report Makes the Case for Interior Design Licensing in California

IIDA Chapters and interior design coalitions are on the front lines of state-level advocacy. Starting today, we are spotlighting the advocacy efforts of these organizations, beginning with the Interior Design Coalition of California. 

Article contributed by the Interior Design Coalition of California.

On Oct. 4, 2016, the Little Hoover Commission released their report on Occupational Licensing in California. The report makes a case for licensing commercial interior design in California, despite interior design was used as an example of a profession that should not be licensed at the first hearing and in initial discussions between commission staff and the Interior Design Coalition of California’s (IDCC) lobbyists. Continued discussions with Commission staff and IDCC testimony in subsequent hearings resulted in the case for the licensing of commercial design.

The Little Hoover Commission is an independent state oversight agency that was created in 1962. The Commission’s mission is to investigate state government operations and promote efficiency, economy, and improved service. By statute, the Commission is a balanced bipartisan board composed of five citizen members appointed by the Governor, four citizen members appointed by the Legislature, two Senators and two Assembly members. The Commission selects study topics that come to its attention from citizens, legislators, and other sources. In addition, it has a statutory obligation to review and make recommendations on proposed government reorganization plans.

This year, the Commission took on the challenge of putting together a series of thoughtful hearings to discuss occupational licensing in California. The focus of the Commission’s review is on the impact of occupational licensing on upward mobility and opportunities for entrepreneurship and innovation for Californians, particularly those of modest means. The Commission also examined the result of occupational licensing on the cost and availability of services provided by licensed practitioners to consumers. Lastly, the Commission explored the balance between protecting consumers and enabling Californians to enter the occupation of their choice.

During the first hearing, one panelist raised interior designers as an example occupation that did not require licensure because the panelist confused the work of designers and decorators. To counter this point, the Interior Design Coalition of California (IDCC) was thrilled to participate in the second hearing in June.  Deborah Davis, FASID, director-at-large for IDCC, testified to the Commission regarding the work of interior designers and the need for interior designers to be licensed in the state of California. Davis was able to educate the Commission on our work and raise a variety of relevant points as to why licensure for interior designers working in the code-impacted environment would especially help those who own small businesses, 90 percent of whom happen to be women. The Commissioners responded well to Davis’ testimony, featuring our arguments in the final report. IDCC is looking forward to continued collaboration with the Little Hoover Commission and other stakeholders in the future as we continue to work towards our goals for the interior design profession in California in 2017 and beyond.

Read the Commission’s Full Report.


The Interior Design Coalition of California advocates for the legal recognition of qualified Interior Designers in the State of California. Through collaboration, education and advocacy, IDCC strives to present a unified voice for the California Interior Design community to support and protect the profession of interior design.

 

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Passion and Practice in Action at the 2016 Advocacy Symposium

Today’s post is written by Stacey Crumbaker, IIDA, Assoc AIA, who attended the 2016 IIDA Advocacy Symposium in Denver on Sept. 23 – 25, 2016. 

The second annual IIDA Advocacy Symposium flew by – a whirlwind of thoughtful, impassioned conversations dedicated to advancing interior design recognition across the country. Hosted in Denver by IIDA and the Rocky Mountain Chapter, the Symposium was an opportunity for interior design advocates to connect, share best practices, and reinvigorate our collective passion for the profession.

Practicing at the intersection of architecture and interior design, I’ve been supporting interior design recognition since moving to Seattle in 2011 and serving as the Vice President of Government and Regulatory Affairs for the Northern Pacific Chapter. Coping with a recent defeat at the capitol, the Chapter had taken a step back to reframe our approach to the legislative process. Our focus shifted to a broader definition of advocacy, which included engaging our city communities and developing a shared vision among our industry professionals. In parallel, the IIDA International Board of Directors prioritized advocacy and launched a series of initiatives to support change, such as the Advocacy Symposium and Advisory Council.  Continue reading

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5 Reasons to Get Motivated About Interior Design Advocacy

Today’s post is guest written by IIDA Professional Member Holly Baird, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP.

Attending the IIDA Advocacy Symposium is a ditch-your-spouse-on-your-wedding-anniversary kind of opportunity. At least, it was for me in 2015.  #sorrynotsorry #advocacyinaction. So what did I learn last year that trumped celebrating my marriage? Here are my top five highlights:

“Never accept a ‘no’ from someone who doesn’t have the power to say ‘yes.’”

IIDA Executive Vice President and CEO Cheryl S. Durst, Hon. FIIDA, LEED AP, painted a picture of advocates as optimists living in the present. They have a healthy respect for the past but don’t dwell on it, and they understand that the future can happen in a nanosecond. Advocates do not let others define who they are in a political context. They know the value of “yes” and when to say “no,” and they know that sometimes “no” is the beginning of the negotiation. Lastly, Cheryl challenged us to “never accept a ‘no’ from someone who doesn’t have the power to say ‘yes.’”

All Wins Matter

Ryan Ben, Student Engagement and Advancement Manager, told us to hone our message: “Find the heart, find the brain, and lose the fat.” The way to motivate others is through positivity – all wins matter. But arguably the best advice Ryan gave actually comes from the incomparable Parks and Recreation character, Ron Swanson: “Never half ass two things. Whole ass one thing.”

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Ryan Ben, Student Engagement and Advancement Manager at IIDA, presenting at last year’s Advocacy Symposium.

 

Be an Out-Hustler

Texas Representative Celia Israel taught us that a lawmaker is only as strong as stakeholder interest and, when you pursue legislation, all the work happens long before the first day of session. She recommended the best way to handle opposition stakeholders is to out-hustle them.

The Power of Networking – and Rising Above

Melanie Bahl, IIDA, President of I.D.E.A.L. for Utah, and lobbyist Amy Coombs told us about the power of asking for recommendations and name dropping shared connections to get your foot in the door. The most resonating piece of advice: the value of being united in purpose, message, and action. “To rise above the din and be heard, voices must be linked in something approaching unison.”

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IIDA Members at the 2015 Advocacy Symposium welcome reception.

 

It’s Not Just About You, It’s About Them

Other lobbyists cautioned us against asking for something the first time you meet a legislator. Go in when you don’t need something. Better yet, go when they need you.

The 2016 IIDA Advocacy Symposium will be educational, inspirational, and even therapeutic. Together, we will celebrate our interior design wins – big and small – from across the nation. The agenda has been carefully crafted with presenters who will arm you with political, grassroots, managerial, and strategic know-how. You will expand your resources, have epiphanies about what you could be doing in your state, and leave refreshed and refueled with new ideas and tactics that will guide you in your advocacy efforts. Fortunately for me, this year’s Symposium doesn’t conflict with my anniversary because I sure would hate to leave my husband a second year in a row. See you in Denver!


 Holly Baird, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP, is the Director of the Tennessee Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. She is a member of the IIDA Advocacy Advisory Council and, in May of this year, was appointed to the Livable Nashville Committee started by Nashville’s Mayor Megan Barry.

 The 2016 Advocacy Symposium will take place in Denver from Sept. 23-25. IIDA Members receive a special discounted rate to the event. Learn more about the Symposium and register by Sept. 16, 2016.

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Advocacy in Action: IDLNY Launches Letter Writing Campaign

The Interior Designers for Legislation in New York (IDLNY) Coalition promotes, supports, and protects the right for interior designers to be able to practice to their fullest abilities. Currently, IDLNY is working with lobbyists in the New York State Senate and Assembly to encourage legislators to support bills S1137 and Assembly Bill A3446, which will allow certified interior designers to submit drawings to their local building authority. If passed, this legislation would grant stamp and seal privileges to interior designers working within the scope of practice as defined by New York State law. In order to make sure the design community’s voice is heard, IDLNY recently launched a letter writing campaign. We talked to Dan Villella, IIDA, VP of Advocacy, IIDA New York Chapter, and a member of the IDLNY Board of Directors to learn more.

IIDA: Tell us more about the IDLNY letter writing campaign.

Villella: The letter writing campaign is a critical strategic element in the effort to gain support for bills S1137 and Assembly Bill A3446. It came together after months of steady and tenacious effort from IDLNY volunteers and the coalition partners to prepare the legislative path, gain support from key officials and legislators, and dot every “i” and cross every “t,” as this process of lawmaking requires. At this critical juncture, the legislative sponsors must hear from their constituents that these bills are worthwhile and necessary. Getting a critical mass of the design community to make their voices heard is absolutely crucial. That’s what this letter writing campaign is all about.

How did you promote the campaign?

Villella: To promote the campaign, the IIDA New York Chapter and the other coalition partners are engaging with the local industry by making announcements at events, distributing fliers, and sending email blasts. We have adopted a digital platform that makes it very easy to send these letters to both the Senate and Assembly bill sponsors. We call it, “Four clicks and two minutes.” People have started telling us it’s even easier than we make it sound: Follow the link, fill in your information, and hit submit. It’s really easy. Continue reading